CartCall

HOW TO SELECT A WETSUIT FOR YOUR SPORT / ACTIVITY

Intro to Selecting a Wetsuit

Intro to Selecting a Wetsuit

How do I choose my wetsuit? First consider whether you need a wetsuit primarily for swimming, surfing, diving, or multiple sports. While some wetsuits can cross-over into other activities, we recommend investing in a wetsuit that is specific to your primary sport. Secondly, consider the water temperature you will be in. Wetsuits have different seam constructions based on water temperature, use and budget. We hope our buyers guide helps you overcome any decision-making anxiety, so you can determine your needs and identify your ideal wetsuit.

How does a wetsuit work?

How does a wetsuit work?

Learn More

Wetsuits work by slowing down heat loss by trapping a thin layer of water between your body and the neoprene rubber in the wetsuit. While you still get wet, your body heats up the thin layer of water trapped against the body to nearly body temperature. Wetsuits can have laminents, these are different types of fabirics that are glued to the rubber to protect it from tearing and in some cases reflect heat back to your body. If temperatures are cold or you get cold easierly consider wearing neoprene boots, gloves, thermal layering accessories and hoods.

Surfing Wetsuits

Surfing Wetsuits

Learn More

You may not realize it, but surfing involves a lot of arm paddling. Consider a wetsuit that has stretchier materials in the upper body (shoulders, arms) or in the entire body of the wetsuit. This will reduce the upper body fatigue that results from repetitive motion. (Insert wetsuit diagram here) In this wetsuit example, there are stretch materials in the upper body of the wetsuit to improve your surfing comfort. LEARN MORE

Diving Wetsuits

Diving Wetsuits

Learn More

Things to consider when selecting a Diving Wetsuit:

Water temperature – Please review our Temperature Guide, it will help you determine what types of gear are available. Cold water diving requires cold water specific diving wetsuits. These wetsuits are specifically designed to withstand the compression that results from going deep underwater. They are also typically made of materials that help to maximize your body’s thermal protection.

Water depth – You may be surprised to learn that the enemy of all wetsuits is depth, not water temperature. As you descend, your neoprene wetsuit compresses very quickly - in some cases to half of its surface thickness within the first 35 feet.

Consider the diving depths you anticipate undertaking before determining the best cold water wetsuit for your needs.

DIVING WETSUIT SYLES

Skinsuits / Non Neoprene
Skinsuits are not made of neoprene. These suits can be made with Lycra blends of material or Poly Fleece blends of material. The Lycra blends do not provide warmth / thermal protection. The Poly Fleece blends are typically used as layering pieces under wetsuits to help wick away water and retain body heat.

See Collection

Springsuits / Shorty
Springsuits wetsuits are available are often identified by their short legs. These wetsuits can have short sleeves or longs sleeves. They can also have back zippers or chest zippers. They are often worn in warmer waters. These wetsuits offer some thermal protection as well as UV protection.

See Collection

Fullsuits / One piece Jumpsuit
Diving wetsuits called fullsuits are the most common. Scuba diving full wetsuits have full length lets and arms. A fullsuit offers more thermal protection than a springsuit. Full suits can come in different thicknesses for different temperature ratings.

See Collection

Two Piece Combo Wetsuits / Farmer John & Jane
Two piece combo wetsuits overlap in the core body. There is a John and a Jacket. Where the two pieces of wetsuit overlap is in the core providing extra thermal protection. The Farmer John & Jane are sleeveless with full legs and the Jacket has long sleeves.

See Collection

Spearfishing Wetsuits
When looking at wetsuits there are three main material options. Closed cell neoprene, open cell neoprene, and Lycra. The neoprene suits generally have a nylon outer shell, but the most efficient types have a smooth rubber shell which is commonly referred to as "Chicle" meaning chewing gum in Spanish.

Closed cell neoprene: The most common of the three mentioned, these suits are easily identifiable by their rigid, rubbery nature. They are less expensive and longer lasting than open cell suits,` but they have several downsides. Closed cell suits are much more constrictive, difficult to get into and out of, less efficient at insulating, and can be slightly abrasive during long diving sessions.

See Collection
Triathlon Wetsuits

Triathlon Wetsuits

If you plan on swimming a lot or doing laps in your wetsuit, we recommend a Triathlon wetsuit. Triathlon wetsuits are specifically designed for swimmers, with more stretch than a typical surfing or diving wetsuit so you benefit from unrestricted movement while swimming. The extra stretch is due to a different cut, materials, and design than conventional wetsuits. Triathlon wetsuits have panels with different thickness and materials (buoyancy) to optimize the swimmer’s positioning. (Note: These wetsuits are not personal flotation devices nor are they intended to protect against sinking or drowning). Additionally, triathlon wetsuits rarely have nylon lament on the exterior so they glide more efficiently in the water with less drag. While these features make a triathlon wetsuit very stretchy, they also make it very sensitive to tearing.

See Collection
Recreational Swimming Wetsuit

Recreational Swimming Wetsuit

If you swim in cold waters consider a wetsuit with a lot of stretch in the upper body. We have had several customer purchase surfing wetsuits or multi sport wetsuits with a lot of stretch in the upper body of the wetsuit for swimming.

You can use our Temperture Guide to assist you in selecting the thickness of the wetsuit. For general water enjoyment consider a wetsuit with a good amount of stretch throughout the wetsuit. As a lap swimmer we recommend a Triathlon wetsuit. Triathlon wetsuits are specifically designed for swimmers, with more stretch than a typical surfing or diving wetsuit so you benefit from unrestricted movement while swimming.

See Collection
Multi-Sport Wetsuit

Multi-Sport Wetsuit

If you do several sports in similar water temperature we consider you select a wetsuit with the right amount of stretch and thermal protection that you need for what you do most. We have had several customer purchase surfing wetsuits or multi sport wetsuits with a lot of stretch in the upper body when doing paddle sports such as Kayaking and SUP (Stand Up Paddle Boarding). If you Wakeboard or do sports like Kiteboarding we recommend wetsuits with stretch in the full body and extra in the upper body.

While a triathlon wetsuit may weem like the perfect wetsuit for multiple sports it, we would strongly recommend against it. Due to these high-rip risk factors, we recommend using your triathlon wetsuit for swimming activities only.

When Looking For A Multi-Sport Wetsuit Here Are Some Factors To Consider:
1. What activity will you be spending most of your time doing in the wetsuit?
2. What is your budget?
3. What will be the most active areas of the wetsuit?

You can use our Temperature Guide to assist you in selecting the thickness of the wetsuit. For general water enjoyment consider a wetsuit with a good amount of stretch throughout the wetsuit.

See Collection

Jump to Top